Inquiring Mind Lecture Series 2017

Feb 22 IQM Ciabattari

White Privilege: The Other Side of Racial Inequality

Wednesday, February 22nd - 6:30 pm

Conversations about racial inequality usually focus on the disadvantages faced by people of color in American society. But there is another side to this inequality: privilege—the advantages that white people experience because of their race. 

Sociology professor Teresa Ciabattari leads an interactive conversation that explores what white privilege is, discusses a variety of examples of privilege for individuals and institutions, and provides tools for learning how to address it. Participants will gain knowledge and resources to foster inclusion and racial justice in their own communities.






Mar 22 IQM Feliks Banel

Diamonds in Ether:  Tuning in to Northwest Radio History
Wednesday, March 22nd - 6:30 pm

Look—and listen—back to the people, stations, and stories that made radio broadcasting a vital part of the culture of the Pacific Northwest.

Innovations in technology, programming, and business as far back as the 1920s made radio in this remote corner a little bit different than the rest of the United States, and connected the people of Washington with events and entertainment from across the country and around the world. 

With a mixture of vintage audio, historic images, and expert storytelling, radio historian and broadcaster Feliks Banel revisits the power of radio in the Evergreen State then and now, and looks ahead to the unpredictable future of local radio in our communities.




Apr 19 IQM Tsutakawa
The Pine and the Cherry:  Japanese Americans in Washington 

Wednesday, April 19th - 6:30 pm

In the lead-up to World War II, Japantown in Seattle featured grocery stores, cafes, and native-language services, as well as labor and music clubs. Trading companies imported Japanese goods, and restaurants served the familiar sukiyaki, tofu, and miso soup. In Eastern Washington, Japanese farmers prospered.

Then came Executive Order 9066. Those born in Japan, as well as their American-citizen offspring, were sent, without due process, to concentration camps in windswept deserts. Throughout the West Coast, 120,000 Japanese Americans were forced from their homes. Most Seattle Japanese spent the war years at Camp Minidoka in Idaho, and when they returned, most had lost everything and could not find jobs.

How did they face this injustice and rebuild their lives? How does a lively immigrant community face racist or religious hatred? The 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066 is in 2017, and Mayumi Tsutakawa, whose father was renowned sculptor George Tsutakawa, will reveal her family’s 100-year history against the backdrop of this dramatic American story.


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Co-sponsored by Humanities Washington, the state's flagship non-profit for promoting and providing programs based in the humanities.  Feeding inquiring minds through engaging discussions. Funding to support this series was also provided by the Friends of the Jefferson County Library.